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Jack White Details

Jack white to play three different Lollapalooza stages

Since we last checked in on Jack White, he's released a new album, wrapped his 'nice velvet croon around some ragtime piano chords,' and found himself in the midst of a food fight…of sorts.

White's latest album, "Lazaretto," bowed June 10, 2014 and was considered his second true "solo" record under his own name (following "Blunderbuss"). The album was released simultaneously with the first single, "High Ball Stepper," and debuted at number one on the Billboard 200 chart. It also broke the record for the largest sales week for a vinyl album since SoundScan began tracking the sales in 1991.

"Lazaretto" was widely praised by critics, and was nominated for three Grammy Awards for Best Alternative Music Album, Best Rock Song and Best Rock Performance (both for the title track). During the supporting tour he also performed the longest show of his career on July 30 at the Detroit Masonic Temple.

White was recently acknowledged for his cover of Harry Connick Jr.'s "Blue Light, Red Light (Someone's There)" (for which Slate talked about that aforementioned 'velvety croon). It appears as a B-side for "That Black Bat Licorice," the latest single off his album.

White also recently made news when, after playing a show at McCasland Field House on the campus of the University of Oklahoma, he publicly called out the university's newspaper for its printing of his contract for the show and his tour rider (which included a very specific recipe for guacamole with step-by-step directions). In the days that followed, OU was apparently informed it was blacklisted from any future Jack White performances, as well as all other artists represented by William Morris Entertainment, though White later issued a statement emphasizing that neither he nor his management said he would never play the university again.

White's upcoming tour will loop through South America, with stops to play three different Lollapalooza stages in Chile, Argentina and Brazil before he'll return stateside to play Coachella in Indio, California in April. Sandwiched between two appearances at that event, he'll fly out to Hawaii to play the Neal S. Blaisdell Center Arena in Honolulu, Hawaii.

Jack White celebrates Record Store Day (Updated 4/24/14)

What would Record Store day be without a memorable and satisfying Jack White stunt? This year, he decided to record the world's fastest record – a live-in-studio version of "Lazaretto," the title track from his forthcoming album. And the time that elapsed from that in-studio performance to the actual vinyl release? About three hours, 55 minutes and 21 seconds start to finish.

The aforementioned feat came just a few weeks after White landed a feature in the New York Times that called him the 'coolest, weirdest, savviest rock star of our time.' That's high praise indeed for the guy who has a multitude of band projects to his name, went solo to great fanfare in 2012 and is about to deliver another brand new LP to the masses.

"Lazzaretto" will bow on June 10, though he's shared some of the new music with fans at recent appearances. Tracks like "Three Women," which is all funky soul, "Just One Drink," which Rolling Stone described as 'Buddy Holly-on-acid' track, and "Would You Fight For My Love," anchored by moody piano and deep, achy strings.

More fans (many, many more) will hear from White when he plays his first headline shows in North America, Europe and the United Kingdom since 2012. The first date on that trek is May 29, when White takes over Cain's Ballroom in Tulsa, Oklahoma. He'll head overseas at the end of June, playing venues like L'Olympia in Paris and the Heineken Music Hall in Amsterdam. He returns to the state in mid-July, and wraps with a stop at the Air Canada Centre in Toronto, Ontario on July 31.

Jack White looks to the future (Updated June 19, 2013)

Jack White is back in the headlines, and this time it's not for storming off a stage at one of the country's most iconic venues.

Some nine months after White walked off stage at Radio City Music Hall just 45 minutes into his set, he's been identified as the 'anonymous donor' who paid $142,000 in taxes needed by Detroit's Masonic Temple to stave off foreclosure. In return the Temple's Cathedral Theater will be named the Jack White Theater in the rocker's honor. (A Detroit native, he had taken the stage at the Temple several times as a youngster).

The good press comes at a good time for White and his label, Third Man Records. Not only are they taking meetings with potential new artists and promoters, they've teamed up with Document Records to reissue the complete remastered works of three Depression-era musical pioneers: Charley Patton, Blind Willie McTell and the Mississippi Sheiks.

Following the success of his debut solo album "Blunderbuss" in 2012, White has told multiple media outlets he's got about 20-25 tracks being worked on for future use on various projects. He's also called 2013 a blank slate, and remains excited about what lies ahead.

About Jack White

Best known as the vocalist, guitarist and pianist of The White Stripes until they split in 2011, Jack White has already reinvented himself. Easily one of the most revered guitarists in all of music, he holds the same gig with The Raconteurs and is also the founding member and drummer of The Dead Weather. The evolution has allowed him to explore different sounds, including bluegrass/backwoods country, rock and roll, pop and metal.

White was born in Detroit and took up a multitude of instruments at an early age, including the drums and guitar. He worked his way through the local music scene, where he crossed paths with a bartender named Meg White. When they married in 1996 Jack took her surname and the pair formed as The White Stripes, spurring the garage rock revival of the late 90's. The band also created controversy by claiming to be siblings, and won three consecutive Grammys after Jack and Meg divorced in 2000.

Collaborating with many different artists has been a staple of White's career. In addition to his work with The White Stripes, by 2009 he had also issued two records with the Raconteurs, worked with Electric Six, recorded a duet with Alicia Keys, and produced several albums for other musicians.

White recently made headlines when he stalked off the stage at New York City's famed Radio City Music Hall after performing for just 45 minutes. Touring to promote his solo record Blunderbuss, he left after just 12 songs. No explanation was given for the quick exit, but he returned for an additional performance the following night and played a full set.